Last edited by Vumuro
Wednesday, November 11, 2020 | History

8 edition of Plague and the End of Antiquity found in the catalog.

Plague and the End of Antiquity

The Pandemic of 541-750

by Lester K. Little

  • 246 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History of medicine,
  • World history: c 500 to C 1500,
  • c 500 CE to c 1000 CE,
  • History / Ancient / General,
  • Ancient - General,
  • History,
  • History: World

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages384
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10437180M
    ISBN 10052171897X
    ISBN 109780521718974


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Plague and the End of Antiquity by Lester K. Little Download PDF EPUB FB2

Plague and the End of Antiquity provide[s] an ideal historic basis for dealing with the many facets of plague today and in the future." Science Book Description. Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. In this volume, the first on the subject, twelve scholars from a variety of disciplines /5(5).

Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. In this volume, the first on the subject, twelve scholars from a variety of disciplines - history, archaeology, epidemiology, and molecular biology - have produced a comprehensive account of the pandemic's origins, spread, and mortality, as well as its economic, social, political, and.

Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Eight centuries before the Black Death, a pandemic of plague engulfed the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and eventually extended as far east as Persia and as far north as the British Isles.

Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Eight centuries before the Black Death, a pandemic of plague engulfed the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and eventually extended as far east as Persia and as far north as the British Isles/5.

Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Eight centuries before the Black Death, a pandemic of plague engulfed the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and eventually extended as far east as Persia and as far north as the British Isles.

Its persisted sporadically from tothe same period that witnessed the distinctive. Plague and the End of Antiquity Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages.

Eight centuries before the Black Death, a pan- His most recent book, Origins of the European Economy: Commu-nication and Commerce, A.D. – (), won the Haskins Medal of. Plague and the End of Antiquity - edited by Lester K.

Little December Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. Plague and the End of Antiquity. Edited by Lester K. Little; Online ISBN:   Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages.

In this volume, the first on the subject, twelve scholars from a variety of disciplines - history, archaeology, epidemiology, and molecular biology - have produced a comprehensive account of the pandemic's origins, spread, and mortality, as well as its economic, social, political, and /5(33).

The Plague of Justinian (– AD, with recurrences until ) was a pandemic that afflicted the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire and especially its capital, Constantinople, as well as the Sasanian Empire and port cities around the entire Mediterranean Sea, as merchant ships harbored rats that carried fleas infected with historians believe the plague of.

Plague and the End of Antiquity. This weekend, I read Kyle Harper’s new-ish book on plague, climate change, and the end of the Roman Empire: The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease and the End of an Empire (Princeton ). I have to admit that I was skeptical before I read the book. The idea that plague contributed to the end of the Roman Empire.

Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Eight centuries before the Black Death, a pandemic of plague engulfed the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and eventually extended as far east as.

@inproceedings{NuttonBookRP, title={Book Review: Plague and the end of Antiquity: the pandemic of –}, author={Vivian Nutton}, year={} } Vivian Nutton Published Medicine Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages.

Eight centuries. The following excerpt comes from Lester K. Little’s book Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of “In the summer of AD a deadly infectious disease broke out in the Egyptian port city of Pelusium, located on the eastern edge of the Nile delta.

It quickly spread eastward along the coast to Gaza and westward to Alexandria. book Plague and the end of Antiquity: the pandemic of Lester K Little Published in in New York NY) by Cambridge university pressCited by: Plague and the End of Antiquity by Lester K.

Little Book Resume: In this volume, 12 scholars from various disciplines - have produced a comprehensive account of the pandemic's origins, spread, and mortality, as well as its economic, social, political, and religious effects.

Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. In this volume, the first on the subject, twelve scholars from a variety of disciplines - history, archaeology, epidemiology, and molecular biology - have produced a comprehensive account of the pandemic's origins, spread, and mortality, as well as its economic, social, political, and /5(8).

Plague and the End of Antiquity. Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Eight centuries before the Black Death, a pandemic of plague engulfed the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and eventually extended as far east as Persia and as far north as the British Isles.

Get this from a library. Plague and the end of antiquity: the pandemic of [Lester K Little; American Academy in Rome;]. Plague and the End of Antiquity Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages.

Eight centuries before the Black Death, a pandemic of plague engulfed the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and eventually extended as far east as Persia and as far north as the British Isles.

Plague and the end of antiquity: the pandemic of [Lester K Little;] this book is an indication that this fascinating topic is finally receiving the scholarly succor and solace in times of plague, with particular reference to Gaul in the early Middle Ages \/ Alain J.

Stoclet -- Plague in Spanish late antiquity \/ Michael. Yet this book is meant to be about ‘Plague and the End of Antiquity’. McCormick envisages a time when science will not only recover epidemiology, but will ‘take us closer than ever to answering the ancient questions of the economic “fall” of the Roman Empire and the origins of the Middle Ages’ (p.

).Author: Peregrine Horden. Late antiquity is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean world, and the Near popularization of this periodization in English has generally been credited to historian Peter Brown, after the publication of his seminal work The World of Late Antiquity ().

Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of (Book) Book Details. ISBN. Title. Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of Author. Little, Lester K. Publisher. Cambridge University Press. Publication Date. Buy This Book. $ plus shipping $ free shipping worldwide.

Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. In this volume, the first on the subject, twelve scholars from a variety of disciplines - history.

According to the book Plague and the End of Antiquity by Lester K. Little, this pandemic collapsed Europe's population by 50% between AD and AD and decimated between a quarter to a half of the human population.

This plague is also known as the Plague of Galen, because it was described at some length by Galen of Pergamum (AD — ), who served for a time as personal physician to Commodus, and is the most important medical scientist of antiquity.

Harper concludes that the Antonine Plague was an outbreak of smallpox. Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of Little, Lester K. This chapter is an excellent addition to the book as it discusses the Plague without relying on Mediterranean sources, which are influenced by shared literary traditions.

Maddicott argues that the monasteries were the focal points for the spread of the Plague outbreaks. Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of –Edited by Lester E.

Little (New York, Cambridge University Press, ) pp. $   Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of – Cambridge, Book Reviews. Download all figures. 45 Views. 0 : John Riddle. Brooke Holmes on Plague in Antiquity and Today. Main page content. Published Date.

Ap Body. During the global crisis brought on by the COVID pandemic, scholars from across the humanities have been pausing to reflect on what their fields can offer to a world that has been forced to reckon with unprecedented circumstances.

While. HOWEVER, if you want to read a book about Justinian's Flea (emphasis on the possessive!) in order to discover how the plague impacted and possibly ended the Roman empire of antiquity, this book will not do.

This book just tells you that the plague killed lots of people/5(17). Plague - Plague - History: Plague is an ancient disease that was described during Classical times as occurring in North Africa and the Middle East. It is sometimes presumed to be the disease behind several historic epidemics, such as the pestilence described as striking the Philistines in the biblical book of 1 Samuel.

Unequivocal evidence for its early existence comes from the. In antiquity, two of the most devastating plagues were the Athenian plague of B.C. and the Justinianic plague of A.D. wrote his Historia Ecclesiastica covering the years at the end of the sixth century.

His is the most personal of the accounts, having contracted the disease himself in while still young. The Christian. Plague was a key factor in the waning of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. In this volume, the first on the subject, twelve scholars from a variety of disciplines - history, archaeology, epidemiology, and molecular biology - have produced a comprehensive account of the pandemic's origins, spread, and mortality, as well as its.

The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness Ancient Rome. Running Press, Little, L. Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of Cambridge University Press, Olmstead, A. History of the Persian Empire. University of Chicago Press, Van De Mieroop, M.

A History of the Ancient Near East ca. - BC, 2nd : Joshua J. Mark. Plague and the End of Antiquity: The Pandemic of – focuses on the Justinian plague.

The editor, Lester K. Little (a historian at Smith College in Massachusetts), and 11 other authors, primarily historians, combine findings from a variety of disciplines, including history, archaeology, epidemiology, and molecular by: 1.

The Plague of Justinian was a pandemic in the Byzantine Empire in the years –It was the first recorded plague pandemic. It is estimated that the Plague of Justinian killed as many as million people across the world, because it returned about every twelve years until when it stopped for about years.

It caused Europe's population to drop by around 50% between. Part of the story has recently been retold by the historian of antiquity, Kyle Harper.

In his brilliant book, The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease and the End of an Empire (Princeton University Press, ), he presents the case for factoring in the devastating impact of climate change and plague on the Roman system.

Plagues, climate change, and the end of an empire: A response to Kyle Harper's The Fate of Rome (3): Disease, agency, and collapse Article (PDF Available) in History Compass 16(2) November Plague and the end of Antiquity: the pandemic of – (ed.), Cambridge University Press in association with the American Academy in Rome pp.

xvii,£, $ (hardback ).Author: Vivian Nutton.